A great end to Bama Angora’s 2016 Fair Season

I hope everyone enjoyed 2016! While the calendar year isn’t over, the last fair for us at Bama Angoras has come to a close. I had a wonderful time at SAFF! We had a lot of people come to see the rabbits at the IAGARB booth at SAFF. Kim at HippityHop (http://hippityhoprabbitry.weebly.com/) definitely helped a lot to make the IAGARB booth work even with a last minute cancellation. If you found this website from information received at SAFF, please remember to check out the main German Angora (IAGARB) website at www.IAGARB.com for more information on the German Angora breed.

If you missed a purchase or decided that you need something extra, you can purchase BamaAngora products at our local yarn store Hook-a-Frog in Madison, AL (http://www.hookafrog.net/). If you don’t see an item you are looking for on the website, please ask Hook-a-Frog because a lot of the inventory is still on the truck and hasn’t had a chance to be re-entered into the online store inventory.

If you are looking for a German Angora Rabbit, please email me directly at contact@BamaAngoras.com. I usually have rabbits available and I will work with you to see if I have what you need.

Now is the time for us to look ahead to this coming year! We are planning next year’s fairs, making decisions on next year’s breeding schedule and evaluating this year’s juniors for promotion to the breeding barn. I hope we can get with District 9 and arrange a fun joint workshop/shearing party together sometime in the few months so please let us know if you are interested. I hope everyone has a wonderful fiber full time with the upcoming holidays!

2016 Breeding Season!

I’m expecting some lovely babies this year. I don’t always get the chance to post them before they are gone so please contact me if you would like to know what is currently available.

Right now I have some hybrids available (They are $100 each.):

I have some babies available now from a litter born in November – a couple of blue does, a blue buck and a lilac buck.

Juniors and Adults available:

I have a 11 month old blue buck and his opal sister, a 2 year old opal buck, and an 11 month old chocolate chestnut buck with a white spot on his nose.  I also have a black doe who is about a year old and a chestnut doe who has been an excellent mother – she is 3 years old.

Black Doe Blue Buck Chocolate Chestnut Buck Ion - Opal Buck Liane - Chestnut Doe Opal Doe

White or Off-White?

Aaron2015

The Angora is known for its bright, blue-white wool. This color is called Red-Eyed White (REW) and is a recessive gene which removes all color from the rabbit.  It doesn’t just remove it from the wool – which is why it is called “red-eyed” since the lack of pigment in the rabbit’s eyes give them a pinkish cast.  Some people don’t like this appearance but still want a white wool. Colored rabbits often have a very pale color to their wool that can give an off-white color.  It is actually harder to find a rabbit with more color intensity than a pale one. If you are breeding and like either dark wool or light wool, color intensity is inheritable and can be selected for in your rabbits. You can see the adult color intensity after their first shear at 8-10 weeks.  The wool next to the body will be the adult color.

This young lady will have very pale wool like her cousin.

Junior Lynx Doe 2015Levi2015-2

 

Welcome New 2015 Babies!

German Angora Babies

New 2015 litters are in! Some beautiful German Hybrids are currently in the nestbox. They should be joined by a couple of German litters soon. I might not get a chance to post individual rabbits so email me if you would like a baby this spring and I will look for your perfect match.

New Babies Available!

These will probably be the last babies available this year (I might have a few Juniors available in the fall).

There are three 94% German Hybrid Does available (an opal, a chocolate and a blue):

Opal Doe94 Chocolate Doe94 Blue Doe94

Two 94% German Hybrid bucks available (a black and a chestnut):

Black Buck94 Chestnut Buck94

and two 97% German Hybrid bucks (a white buck and a black buck with a white spot on his chin):

White Buck97 Black Buck97

Fun with Spinning

Blue Angora Yarn

This is what I love about the German Angoras – not only do I get nice soft wool to spin, I get lots of it!  I just spun these two skeins of 100% Angora wool from the wool from the last shearing of my Blue German Hybrid buck.  One shearing gave me 480 yards of fingering weight yarn, easily enough to knit a beautiful scarf, and I will get the same amount every 90 days,  Now the only hard choice I have to make is which scarf to knit!

New Babies Available!

The January kits have been weaned and are ready to go to their new homes!  I have bunnies from three litters available – a 94% German litter ($100 each), a 92.5% litter ($100 each) and a 72% litter ($80 each).  I have mostly chestnut and black available with a few white and opal and one little blue.

Remember this guy?

Kit with white foot

He has really grown!

DSCF2515

Here are some of his siblings (94% German bunnies):

DSCF2495DSCF2505DSCF2517

Remember these ones?

LilyDaughterLitterJan14 Day 8

Here are some of the 72% bunnies now:

DSCF2524DSCF2527DSCF2498DSCF2504

 

If you are interested in any of these contact me via contact@bamaangoras.com

I regularly travel to Cookeville, TN so pickup can be arranged anywhere between there Huntsville, AL.

2014 Angora Rabbit Litters at 1 Week

LilyDaughterLitterJan14 Day 8

They are growing quick!  Remember what they looked like a week ago:

LilyDaughterLitterJan14

It is amazing how much they grow in such a short time.  They are finally starting to look like rabbits.

Kit with white foot

Even at this age you should be evaluating your kits.  This kit has a white foot which is a fault.  While he will not be suitable for breeding, he can still be a nice wooler for someone.

2014 Angora Rabbit Litters Day 6

LilyDaughterLitterJan14 Day 6

The kits are growing and becoming more active.  It took about two dozen pictures to get this one because the kits were in constant motion.  There are one or two kits in each litter who are not getting fed as often as they should.  This number is unusually high.  I believe it is related to the constant below freezing temperatures.  Water in these temperatures begins freezing instantly.  Despite offering fresh water several times a day to the does, I think that not having water constantly available is affecting their milk production.  To help catch the smallest kits up, I combined them (marking them to make sure they returned to the correct litter) and offered them to the doe who was producing the most milk.  She immediately fed them and I returned them to their litters.  This requires more effort but hopefully the extra feeding will strengthen them and prevent any losses.

These persistent freezing temperatures are abnormal for this area.  Unfortunately you cannot predict extreme weather conditions a month ahead of time, but you need to be aware of the risks, and be willing to take steps to mitigate them.  I stop breeding in April because the heat can kill the pregnant does, and the young kits.  Here, the heat is more likely to kill than the cold so I prefer to risk the cold.   If these weather conditions occur more often, I would either choose not to breed this time of year, or adjust my rabbitry to better accommodate breeding at these temperatures.